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Lyric endpin is to short to go through end block

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  • Lyric endpin is to short to go through end block

    I have a vintage gibson j45 and am trying to install the Lyric however I'm running into a bit of a problem. The end block is too thick for the lyrics endpin jack to come out the outside of the guitar (it is pretty much flush with the outside) so there is no way to thread the nut on.

    Does and one have a solution for this problem?? Or is there an extra long version of the lyric??

  • #2
    Hey dashenfelder,
    From time to time we do encounter a guitar with a thicker endpin block, but it's not too common outside of some vintage instruments.

    If you unthread the jack barrel cover as far as it will go without coming off, you should have a full inch (1") of length to work with. If the tailblock is thicker than that, then you would need to counter-sink the inside of the tailblock from the inside of the guitar, which is not an easy task. The jack manufacturer doesn't make a longer version, so the options that you have are pretty limited.

    Here in our factory we have a tool that we made for countersinking the inside of the tailblock hole, made from a 7/8" spade drill bit. If you would like any information on how we made it, I would be happy to share.

    Of course, if you have any more questions, please let me know.

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    • #3
      Similar issue with Levin

      Hi Caleb

      I have the same issue with a 1964 Levin dreadnaught

      Would be interested in details of the tool you have mentioned.

      Also....... the bracing on the Levin does not leave space to fit the lyric on the bridgeplate in front of the bridge and there's not enough space on the bridgeplate behind. Is it ok to fit the mic directly to the top behind the bridge?

      Cheers
      Vince

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      • #4
        Countersink Front.jpg

        Here's a picture of the tool. As you can see, it's a 7/8" spade bit, with a 1/2" tube (slightly thinned for the 1/2" hole) glued onto the shaft to center the bit in the hole.

        The lower corners of the bit were ground to a right angle on a bench grinder, making the bit more "square". Then a chisel-type edge was ground into the bottom so that the bit would cut from the lower end of the "spade". You can see the edge if you look closely at the picture below.

        Countersink Side.jpg

        From there, the bit's shaft is put through the tailblock of the guitar from the inside of the guitar, and attached to the drill on the outside. Depending on which way you set your edge, the drill will need to be in the forward or backwards mode. I usually put a piece of tape on the shaft, flush with the outside of the hole. This gives me a starting point for reference, so I don't go too far.

        Of course, this is something that we have refined here in our shop, so if you decide to go ahead with making your own, please proceed with care. It would take a skilled Luthier to repair a broken tailblock.

        If you have any more specific questions, please let me know.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Caleb_Elling View Post
          [ATTACH=CONFIG]95[/ATTACH]

          Here's a picture of the tool. As you can see, it's a 7/8" spade bit, with a 1/2" tube (slightly thinned for the 1/2" hole) glued onto the shaft to center the bit in the hole.

          The lower corners of the bit were ground to a right angle on a bench grinder, making the bit more "square". Then a chisel-type edge was ground into the bottom so that the bit would cut from the lower end of the "spade". You can see the edge if you look closely at the picture below.

          [ATTACH=CONFIG]96[/ATTACH]

          From there, the bit's shaft is put through the tailblock of the guitar from the inside of the guitar, and attached to the drill on the outside. Depending on which way you set your edge, the drill will need to be in the forward or backwards mode. I usually put a piece of tape on the shaft, flush with the outside of the hole. This gives me a starting point for reference, so I don't go too far.

          Of course, this is something that we have refined here in our shop, so if you decide to go ahead with making your own, please proceed with care. It would take a skilled Luthier to repair a broken tailblock.

          If you have any more specific questions, please let me know.
          I installed an M1A in my 1956 J-45 several years ago and had a similar problem. My solution was less elegant but involved no countersinking of the tail block. I used a tapered hand reamer to enlarge the end pin hole to 1/2" so the jack could pass completely thru the end pin hole. Then I bought a flat washer whose ID allowed it to fit over the jack body and whose OD was larger than the hole. I used JB Weld to epoxy the washer on the jack to form a "stop" inside the guitar that the jack to extend far enough thru the tail block to put the outside nuts on. This avoided the complex process of countersinking and has served me well for the past several years.

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          • #6
            Genius

            Nice one Dakota

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